Tag: house

Architecture & Building

What are eaves in architecture?

What are eaves in a house?  

The area where a roof extends a small way past the wall of a building is usually referred to as the eaves. The term ‘eaves’ typically refers to the combination of soffit and fascia that adorn the overhang of a roof. 

Types of eaves –  

There are four basic types: 

  • Exposed – the finished underside of the roof and supporting rafters are visible from the underneath.  
  • Soffit – includes a soffit – the panelling which forms the underside of the eaves, connecting the bottom tip of the eave with the side of the building at a 90-degree angle.  
  • Boxed in – encases the roof rafters but meets the side of the building at the same angle as the roof pitch. 
  • Abbreviated – cut off almost perpendicular with the side of the building.  

Are eaves the same as soffits?  

To summarise the difference between the two, the eave is an area of the roof which overhangs the walls, whereas the soffit is the underside component of this area. In the widest sense, soffits can refer to the underside of almost anything that’s constructed, including arches and porches. An eave is part of a roof system and a soffit is part of the eave. In simple terms, eaves and soffits are two different parts of the same structure.  

Why do you need them?  

They can define the style of a home, and they also have a major function. They can protect the siding and foundation of a structure. A roof’s eaves sticking out beyond the sides allow snow and rain to fall from the roof away from the sides and to the ground. This can prevent leakage-related damage to the building façade.  

Eaves can also provide shading to windows, helping to maintain comfortable internal conditions. In the winter the low sun is able to enter through the windows to warm the interior. Whereas, in summer, they prevent direct sunlight from entering your home.  

How much does it cost to replace eaves on a house?  

The average cost to repair roof eave damage can be anywhere between £345 – £1000. However, most people pay around £675 to have a carpenter repair a 30 linear feet section of the soffits and fascia damaged by moisture or insects. The maximum cost of roof eaves can go up to £3,100.  

17,507 Eaves Stock Photos, Pictures & Royalty-Free Images - iStock

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Uncategorised

A Guide to Commercial Buildings

What is a commercial building used for?

A commercial property is a space that allows you to use the space for commercial activities such as food service, retail or any other business. Commercial buildings have been split into classifications designated into class A, B and C. 

Class A buildings are usually newer construction properties with better amenities and infrastructure. However, this could be an older building that has been remodelled. Usually located in a popular area. 

Class B buildings are maintained and well managed. Not always a new build but can be easily transformed by some renovations. 

Class C buildings are often old properties, located in unbeneficial areas that are less maintained. There are building tends to need more work done. Landlords will charge less due to the work needing to be done. 

Classifications  

Classifications for each building:

A1 – shops such as:  

  • Retail (not hot food) 
  • Post office 
  • Hairdressing 

A2 – Professional services 

  • Banks 
  • Health and medical services 

A3 – Food and Drink  

  • Cafes  
  • Restaurants   
  • Anything that serves hot food 

A4 – Drinking establishments  

  • Bars 
  • Wine bars  

B1 – Business 

B8 – Storage and Distribution  

  • Wholesale warehouse 
  • Distribution centre  
  • Repositories 

C1 – Hotels  

  • Hotels  
  • Guest homes  

C2 – Residential institutions  

  • Boarding schools 
  • Training centre 
  • Hospitals  
  • Nursing homes  

Do I need planning permission?  

Yes, you do, it is essential that you have planning permission for commercial buildings.

When do you need commercial planning permission? 

You will definitely need to have planning permission if you intend to: 

  • Add an extension or large-scale renovation. 
  • Build a new property. 
  • Change the use of the building. For example, changing the use from commercial to residential or residential to commercial. 

Do I need Planning permission if I work from home? 

Using space in your home will not usually need planning permission. However, you should get planning permission if: 

  • Your business is unusual to be in a residential area. 
  • Your employees work from your home. (But are not occupants) 
  • The number of customers visiting your home increases. 
  • Your business could disturb your neighbours. 

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House Renovation, Interior Design

10 ways to modernise your old house and make it feel brand new

As the saying goes don’t move, improve. Especially if you love your house but want to modernise it to become more of your style. Adding affordable improvements can also add value to your home and can maximise how you use it.

Remove walls – 

removing the walls between the dining and living room or even the kitchen can transform an older home. Creating an open plan living space and making the room feel airy and modern, without damaging the character too much. 

How to Divide an Open-plan Space With a Half-wall | Houzz UK

Replace or clean the flooring –  

If the older house has a dirty carpet, it would be best to either clean it or buy a new one and make the space feel fresh. And if the flooring is wood or dark in colour to modernise the place you should opt for a lighter colour choice. 

▷ How to replace carpet with vinyl flooring? And why? | L'Antic Colonial

Paint the walls – 

The walls in outdated houses often have crazy wallpaper or dark paint on them. To make your home modern you need to choose colours that will tie your home together. This is an affordable easy way to transform your house quickly.  

Bright Pieces gallery wall - White and gold - desenio.co.uk

Install larger windows –  

By replacing the old windows with larger ones or by adding bi-fold doors it can open up a space. By doing this you will be creating indoor/ outdoor living which has become a very popular style of home design.   

50 Living Rooms with Big Windows (Photos) - Home Stratosphere

Replace old fixtures  

From light switches to cabinet handles, fixtures can really date a home. Update these common fixtures in your home and they will bring your design.  

  • Light switches 
  • Outlets and plugs 
  • Cabinet hardware 
  • Door handles  
  • Indoor and outdoor light fixtures 
Modern Nordic Lighting | Wayfair

Hide the clutter –  

Having numerous ornaments, pictures and magazines can instantly make a home feel outdated and uninviting. Having multi-functional furniture and hidden storage is a simple way to declutter and give your space a modern feel.  

Amazon.com: HOMCOM 39" Modern Lift Top Coffee Table Desk with Hidden  Storage Compartment for Living Room, Coffee Brown Woodgrain : Home & Kitchen

Add new lighting to your home – 

Having proper lighting can bring a room to life. A poorly lit room looks small, dark, and cramped, while a bright room appears open and welcoming. The easiest way of doing this is by adding lamps to dark areas and replacing the ceiling lights.  

Lenny Smoked Glass Table Lamp | Dunelm

Landscape the garden – 

 Landscaping is often overlooked. Planting more trees and flowers or having freshly cut grass can transform the garden and the look of the house. Many outdated houses have overgrown plants or plants that need a lot of love. To modernise the house, you should show just as much care to the outside as you do on the inside.  

9 Peter Fudge Gardens ideas | modern garden, landscape design, outdoor  gardens

Revamp the fireplace –  

A fireplace is a great focal point to a room. However, because fireplaces first became popular in the 70s and 80s you may need to make some changes for them to become modern. 

Traditional or Modern Fireplace? | Heat & Glo

Refresh or replace internal doors –  

You can give any room an update with a new door. By repainting or adding glass windows to the doors it can transform the entire layout of a home. Glass doors create an open-plan area without removing any internal walls, which is perfect for families.

An inspiring guide to French door perfection.

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Design and Inspiration

Everything You Need to Know About Installing a Balcony

How much does it cost to add a Balcony? 

Depending on the complexity of the job would depend on the price. The estimated price to installing a balcony would vary between £1,500 – £5,500. 

The estimated cost would cover: 

  • Size
  • Design  
  • Labourer costs 
  • Material costs 
  • How complex the job is. 

Types of balconies  

  • Stacked – The most popular and common. Easy to install. 
  • Juliet/Faux – This is a faux balcony that may contain a small standing area but usually does not. A Juliet balcony contains a balustrade connection to the building without flooring to walk on. 
  • Hung – This structure is made out of stainless-steel cables that are fixed on the sides of the structure. These balconies are less common but have great strength. 
  • Cantilevered – This structure can be made from concrete, steel or timber. This type of project needs to be planned accordingly as the job is quite complex. 
  • Mezzanine – They have a large decking area with railing. This structure gives you more space. 

Do I need planning permission to install a balcony? 

If your home is in a conservation area or your property is listed you must apply for planning permission. 

In other cases, if your balcony is smaller that 300mm you may not have to seek planning permission but it is always best to do so. When submitting your planning application form expect to pay a fee. 

Installing a Juliet/Faux balcony means you won’t have to apply for planning permission, unless you decide to add flooring to walk on and then you must. 

Will it raise my house value? 

There are no guarantees that this will raise the price value, but they have been known the raise the value up to 12%. 

What are balconies used for? 

Balconies are used for extras space, kind of like an outdoor room. Many people like to use their balcony like a garden. For example adding a barbecue or flowers onto it. Others like to use their balcony to admire the views the structure allows them to see and relax on it. 

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Uncategorised

Beginners Guide of Removing Your Chimney Breast

What is your chimney breast for? 

The chimney breast is the part that peeks outwards into the depths of your home. They ae mostly seen in older homes. In the past this was the main way of heating our homes, this was an important element in pushing heat throughout our houses. However today chimneys are rarely used due to central and electric heating. 

Why would you want to remove your Chimney breast? 

For some a chimney breast is seen as something that takes up valuable space that could be used for something else. However, some people love the idea of an open fireplace which is also the most inefficient way to burn fuel at home. Some may have the chimney-piece removed for an eco-friendlier way of heating. 

Removing the Chimney, the correct way  

This is not a quick DIY job. When removing the chimney-piece, you are also removing an important load-bearing wall. Due to this you need to ensure that the structural integrity of your building isn’t put at risk.  

One of the most common internal altercations carried out is to remove an obsolete chimney breast at ground floor level to create more floor space. Commonly chimneys are also removed at first floor level leaving the roof bare and external section of the chimney in place.  

Building regulations apply to this work because it is material altercation to the structure ensuring the remaining part of the stack is properly supported. 

Regulations and considerations  

There is a lot of planning, approval and checks that are needed to be done, plus your labourer. The next steps you should go through is: 

  • Planning permission 
  • Get building regulations approved 
  • Party wall agreement (only if you have adjoined neighbours) 
  • Speak to structural engineer  
  • New building support structure  

What will the structure engineer do? 

The help of a structure engineer will determine how the chimney breast should be removed in the safest way. 

The Party wall agreement 

This step only applies if your property is adjoined to a neighbouring property. This means you must inform and agree with your neighbours on any work done on a shared boundry. 

Costs of removing the chimney breast 

Removing a chimney breast isn’t a low-cost project, the total cost will depend on the complexity of the job and how much you want removed. For example, only removing the ground floor chimney-piece could cost around £1,500 estimated, but wanting to remove the entire chimney it could cost around £4,000 estimate. 

Can you still have a fire without the chimney breast?  

Yes… There are other options to pick from such as: 

  • Balanced flue gas fires 
  • Flueless gas fires 
  • Electric fires 
  • Wall mounted fires. 

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Advice Center

The Ultimate Guide To An HMO Property

What is an HMO? 

A house in multiple occupations (HMO), is a property rented out by at least three people who are not from one household, for example, a family. However, they share facilities like the bathroom and kitchen. They’re known as house shares.  

However, many types of accommodation could be an HMO. These may include:  

  • Hostels 
  • Lodgings 
  • Shared houses 
  • Refuges 
  • Private halls of residence 
  • Blocks of converted flats 
  • Employee accommodation 
  • Building containing numerous bedsits with shared facilities 
  • Buildings containing flats with their own facilities, but are not self-contained 

Design –  

In HMOs, the bathrooms, kitchen, stairs, gardens and landings are designated as common areas shared by all tenants. In addition, the house may be divided up into self-contained flats, bed-sitting rooms or simple lodgings. 

What determines whether the property is an HMO or not? 

Properties must have these four common features before being classified as an HMO: 

  • Occupants are not forming a single household 
  • Occupants must be using the property as their main residence 
  • Used for residential purposes 
  • One of the occupants must be paying rent  

Households are regarded as family members living together or single people living alone.  

HMO Licences – 

HMOs require a licence from the local council in the area the property is located, which is valid for five years. For instance, the general rule is that any property with five or more people from two or more separate households that share facilities requires a licence. Although this depends on the council, some smaller properties with fewer tenants can also require a licence.  

The standard HMO licence fee is £1,100, split into two payments. For larger HMOs with more than ten units of accommodation, the fee increases by an extra £50 for each additional unit of accommodation.  

The pros and cons of renting an HMO by room  

Pros  

  • Usually more profitable as you can charge a higher rent per room 
  • Can let the room on a licence (this makes things easier if you need to evict a tenant) 
  • You cannot be excluded from the common parts. Only individual rooms 
  • If one tenant leaves, you are losing less rent than if a whole group moves out 

Cons  

  • So, you will be responsible for paying and managing bills  
  • Tenants do not know each other which may result in mismatch of personalities and potentially cause issues 
  • A tenant is only responsible for their room, not the common parts. In addition, this means if there is any damage it may be difficult to prove who caused it  

Are HMOs profitable? 

HMOs can be very profitable because you can charge rent per room that totals more than if you let the property to one household. For example, you could rent a 3-bed property for £1000 per month to a family, or 3 rooms for £400 each giving a total of £1200.  

Are you aware of the HMO Changes for Landlords coming into effect in  October?

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Extensions, House Extension

What You Need To Know About Flat-Pack Extensions

With not enough houses on the market, and unstable house prices more people are choosing to improve their homes rather than moving. Although it can be a better investment, extensions are not cheap. This is why people are looking for a low-cost option.  

This is why flat-pack extensions are on the rise. Because they are pre-made additions they have been gaining popularity, thanks to their budget-friendly price and quick installation. They are also a great way of adding extra space to your home if you don’t have the space or don’t want construction work going on.  

What is a flat-pack extension?  

A flat-pack extension is a home addition that is built off-site. Either in a workshop or a factory. Once it is constructed it’s delivered to your home, and then put together by the extension provider and a contractor.  

Just like a normal extension, there are many different styles of flat-pack extensions, for example:  

  • Steel 
  • Timber  
  • Brick   
  • uPVC  

Do you need planning permission with a flat-pack home?  

Yes, flat-pack require the same planning and building regulations as a traditional extension. Although, if you are within the permitted development rights you will be able to extend your home without planning permission.  

Flat-pack Extension costs –  

On average a flat-pack extension would cost between £1,260 and £1,680 per square meter for a room that is at a plastered finish. So, you can expect to pay around £25,000-£33,000 for an average-sized single-story extension. However, you need to keep in mind that this doesn’t include paint, flooring, and lighting. All designs are unique so the prices will vary. And also, fees could become 10-15% higher if you’re getting help from architects, planning officers, and engineers.  

Pros – 

One major benefit to having a flat-pack extension is that the only on-site work that needs to be completed is digging the foundations and connecting the utilities. Another benefit is that it would cause less disruption to your everyday life and the neighbour’s and it would be less of an inconvenience.   

Cons –  

With flat-pack extensions, you are limited in the designs you choose, and you might not be able to get an extension that matches your home. This could affect your planning permission and devalue the property. They are also more common on the rear of the property. Which is a disadvantage for someone who was hoping to add a side or a two-story extension.  

What are my options? - Habattach - Modular Extension | elink
Flat-pack extension

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Architecture & Building, Flat Conversions

Looking To Live In A Maisonette? Everything You Should Know

What is a maisonette?  

It is a set of rooms for living in, typically on two storeys of a larger building and having a separate entrance.  

The difference between a maisonette and a flat –  

A maisonette is a two-storey flat, where the front door is your own. This means you can exit your home directly to the outside. However, with a regular flat, you have a shared corridor. And your usual flat consists of several rooms that span a single floor.  

Maisonettes are often more bespoke than flats and aren’t typically sold as part of a development block. They also vary largely in square footage, layout, and spec. Living in a maisonette also gives you more outside space as opposed to a flat.  

Is a maisonette a house? 

They are not necessarily a house although they can come with similar square footage and many of the same perks. For instance, they offer similar privacy to that of a house, and they are argued to be safer. Because with all the windows on the higher level, and the only access is the front for it is less likely you would get burgled. 

Maisonettes are ideal for families because just like a house they often house gardens and sometimes even garages. However, the garden might have to be shared with others in the flats. And you’ll have to access the garden separately outside, typically through a side gate.  

Where can I find them?  

In the UK maisonettes are not uncommon, you can find them usually above shops, in town centres and close to cities. Due to them being slightly smaller and more affordable than a house many are located in cities.  

They are also popular in areas with lots of students because landlords convert one house into two separate dwellings to take on more tenants.  

Is it good to live in one?  

There are plenty of advantages to living in a maisonette the first one is that they are warm and cosy. Being upstairs is a major positive especially in the winter because the heat from the downstairs flat rises and it heats up the house.  

Maisonettes often also have a lot of storage compared to a flat or an apartment. This is because most of them have exterior storage such as a garage.  

Maisonettes itself would be about 20-25% cheaper than the equivalent space in that block.  

Some negatives to living in one –  

Although there are many positives, there are some hurdles to living in a maisonette. With either no off-road parking or a shared driveway parking you can be difficult. And a lot of people find parking on a residential street a nightmare.  

When living above someone you have to be extra neighbourly, you need to be respectful and keep an eye on the amount of noise you make.  

8 Maisonette Designs That Are a Step Up from Your Usual HDBs | Qanvast
A modern maisonette

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Design and Inspiration

Top 5 Best House Styles

Put simply, Architectural Style is what defines the way a house feels and looks. In Britain, there are many house styles to choose from. They reflect the trends, wealth level and the general mood of the era they were built in.

In many instances, a walk down the street can take you on something of an immersive trip through history. Undoubtedly, you will pass by houses that were all created at various points in time.

Here, we have selected 5 of the most popular house styles for you to sink your teeth into. Perhaps you are building your own home and are trying to recreate a certain style. Or maybe you are simply carrying out a renovation project and want to know how to remain authentic. Easy. At Pro Arkitects – Design & Build Experts, we’ve got the guide for you.

1. Georgian (1714 – 1830)

Spanning multiple generations, Georgian Architecture receives it’s namesake from the reigns of the first four King Georges of England. These spaciously sized, classical buildings are known for their distinctly reserved elegance. Their satisfying symmetry, accomplished partly by applying the golden ratio, is extremely pleasing to the eye. Georgian-style homes were constructed primarily to offer a more generous sense of space. Furthermore, they offered natural light, which had been noticeably absent from many earlier architectural styles.

A varied and highly influential category, Georgian Architecture encompasses many types of houses. These include stately English country mansions, as well as terraced townhouse blocks in London and Dublin.

2. Modern/ New Build (1990’s and Beyond)

By the 1990’s, the British public desperately craved a change in house style. People wanted more traditional features in their homes, following the exposed shortcomings of the popular modernist structures of the 1960’s. As a result, new build houses outwardly mirrored older buildings once more. Rendered walls, mock timber framing and cottage features all appealed to buyers, approaching the end of the century.

Most notably, insulation started being introduced into walls and loft spaces around this stage. Additionally, double glazing began to be retrofitted into most homes. Safety standards were improved during this period, with more elaborate security measurements, such as gas and fire safety, being implemented. It was at this time that build estates were laid out at angles or staggered back to resemble villages.

3. Eco-Build (2000’s and Beyond)

If the 1990’s saw modernism rejected, in the 2000’s, it rose significantly in popularity. This, along with people’s desire to live in more environmentally-friendly, sustainable homes, has led to the modern minimalist style.

The shape and form of these properties take into consideration the importance of shade and sunlight. Homes can now be built to reduce heat loss, with heat exchangers being used to provide fresh air and warmth. Solar panels are fitted into new homes, and open plan interiors can be designed without the problems caused by draughts.

Exposed steelwork and timber cladding are common features in modern builds, as are large expanses of glass. These, thanks to new double and triple glazing technology, can now be fitted whilst maintaining thermal efficiency.

4. Pre-Georgian (1660 – 1688)

Unlike Henry VII, the Stuart Kings were more open to the architectural fashions from Europe. Inigo Jones became one of the first individuals to apply this style to buildings for the Royal Family. However, it would not be until after 1660 that this style would begin to transform housing.

Timber framed homes were still popular with merchants and farmers in the countryside during this period. However, the homes of those who were better off were becoming increasingly built of stone and brick. It was at this point also that 2 storey homes with bedrooms above ground floor rooms became more common.

5. Edwardian (1901 – 1910)

During the Edwardian era, the Baroque style of the late 17th century was adapted for grand houses and public buildings.

As many rejected the mass produced goods of the industrial age, craftsmanship and traditional forms of building were revived. It was during this time that the Arts and Crafts Movement led to a rise in vernacular architecture and timber framing. Pebbledash and hanging tiles could be found on most Edwardian terraces. White painted timber porches and balconies, with intricate fretwork and balusters, were also popular.

The exterior of Edwardian homes were still colourful, but the patterns were generally more subdued than the Victorian era. With the arrival of gas and electric lighting, houses did not get as dirty. This encouraged people to decorate with lighter, brighter wallpapers and curtains.

Conversions, Extensions, Loft Conversion

Things You Need To Know When Converting Your Bungalow

Converting your bungalow by extending upwards or adding another storey is a great way to add lots of space at an affordable price. If you have a larger property you may be able to extend the back and the side of the property.

Bungalow Loft Conversion –

You can extend upward. There are four main types of loft conversions that can be suited for bungalows. They are a dormer loft conversion, a hip to gable conversion, a Velux conversion, or a mansard loft conversion. Before you decide on what conversion you like you should get advice on the best type of conversion for your bungalow, depending on its existing structure.

Most bungalow loft conversions don’t require planning permission and it comes under permitted development. As long as they meet some key conditions:

  • Firtsly, if your bungalow is in a conservation area or an area of outstanding natural beauty then you will need to apply for planning permission.
  • Secondly, you’re not allowed to raise the height of the roof
  • On the main elevation facing the highway, you’re not allowed to construct dormers or anything that projects out of the roof.
  • No balconies or raised platforms are permitted
  • Finally, materials must be similar in appearance to the existing bungalow

One of the big attractions of converting a bungalow loft is that it is usually a lot cheaper than a conversion in a regular home. A simple conversion would likely cost around £20,000 to £25,000 for a standard bedroom. Whereas, if you want to add dormer windows and an En suite the prices could be around £40,00. The most a loft conversion could cost with everything included could be around £65,000.

A typical bungalow loft conversion can take about 6 to 8 weeks. Although if you have to apply for planning permission you would need to add a couple of months to the timescale.

Bungalow Extension –

You do not need planning permission for an extension if you build within your permitted development rights. Without planning permission, you can build up to 6 meters or 8 depending on if your house is detached. The average single-storey bungalow extension cost is around £1875 per meter square.

Homeowners in the UK could add up to £100,000 to the value of their homes by converting their property.

Bungalow Conversion

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