Tag: historic

Advice Center

A Full Beginner’s Guide To A Heritage Impact Assessment

Firstly, if you are thinking of buying a listed building or moving into a conservation area, and are thinking of making external changes to your home, this blog is for you.  

Altering or extending a listed building isn’t like changing any other type of structure. The level of information about the existing property, and what you propose to change about it is very different from a standard planning application. One thing you need to supply is a Heritage impact statement.  

What is a heritage impact assessment?  

A heritage impact assessment (HIA)is a document that outlines the historic or archaeological significance of a building or landscape within its wider setting. In addition, it includes an outline of any proposed works. Also, an assessment of their impact on the building or landscape, and a mitigation strategy.  

For example, The document considers the:  

  • The cultural heritage of the place 
  • The nature of proposed development 
  • The likely impact of that development on the significance of the place.  

Understanding the significance of a historic building complex or area and the possible impact of the proposed scheme on this sign is the key to good conservation practice. In addition, good information, available from the outset, can speed up the processing of applications. It can also reduce costs and lead to a better overall design.   

Why do you need a heritage impact assessment? 

You need to submit a heritage statement when you are proposing works that could affect a heritage asset in some way.   

A heritage impact assessment is needed for an application that affects a heritage asset. For instance, this would be needed for: 

  •  listed building consent applications 
  • Planning permission applications for sites within the setting of a listed building 
  • Building or developing in conservation areas 
  • Planning permission applications for sites within the scheduled ancient monument 
  • Planning permission applications for sites within registered parks and gardens 
  • Advertising consent applications on listed buildings or buildings in conservation areas. 

How much does the heritage assessment cost?  

Finally, depending on the simplicity or complexity of the proposed development. An assessment could be anywhere between, a £220 single-page letter of opinion. Or a full-blown £22,000 report.  

How the Heritage Impact Assessment process protects historic sites |  Planning, BIM & Construction Today

Contact us

Advice Center, Planning Permission

Top Things You Need To Know About Listed Buildings

What is a listed building? 

A listed building is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England, historic environment Scottland, and in Wales and historic Northern Ireland. A listed building may not be demolished, extended, or altered without special permission from the local planning authority. 

There are three types of listed buildings and they are:  

  • A Grade l – Buildings of exceptional interest. 
  • Grade ll* – Particularly important building of more than special interest.  
  • Grade ll – Buildings that are of special interest, warranting every effort to preserve them. 

How to know if your buildings are listed?  

You are able to check if the property is listed by viewing the national heritage list for England.  

If you are planning to buy a listed building, a full building survey (RICS level 3) is recommended. And these surveys are tailored to each individual property and cover everything that is possible to access and assess.  

When building on a listed property you will firstly need to get both planning permission and consent. So you will then need patience, stamina, and a good architect. This is because there’s a lot that goes into building on a listed property. 

What happens if you don’t get consent?  

Carrying out building works to a listed building or changing it in any way without consent can result in court action and legal penalties. And it is also illegal to fail to comply with an enforcement notice.  

Because of how much more work it is renovating or trying to get permission, it can cost between 30-50% more to make changes to a listed building than a normal one.  

Listed buildings account for about 2% of English building stock. And in March 2010, there were about 374,000 list entries, of which 92% were grade ll, 5.5% were grade ll* and 2.5% were grade l. So it’s estimated that there are about 500,000 actual listed buildings in England. 

If your house is Grade I or Grade II* listed it may be appropriate to use traditional paints with white lead pigment or high solvent content. However, their toxicity means they are restricted by environmental legislation and their use permitted only under licence. 

Buying a listed building? Expert advice to ease the process | Tayler and  Fletcher
Listed buildings

Contact us