Tag: flat

Extensions, House Extension

The Ultimate Beginners Guide To Ground Floor Flat Extensions

Improving your home is becoming very popular among homeowners who are looking for more space. This is because with property prices increasing, it is becoming more expensive to move houses. If you own a ground floor flat it can be greatly improved by a bit of construction work.  

Ownership of the flat –  

Firstly, if you are a leaseholder and want to commence works on the property, you must get freeholder consent before you can carry out any internal or proposed building extensions.  

The lease plans will tell you whether the demised premises space is occupied under a lease contract. This includes the garden that comes with the flat, or whether you simply have permission to use it. Some leases don’t allow any construction to take place in the garden, so make sure you check.  

Do you need planning permission?  

Before going into the planning process, it’s a good idea to know what you are trying to gain from the proposed space.   

When adding an extension onto a ground floor flat, planning permission is a must. However, with the right architects by your side, this doesn’t have to be stressful. 

To add an extension to your flat you must apply for planning permission. If your flat is a listed building it is likely that you will need listed building consent. You should contact your local planning authority for advice before you start work. 

Adding work to a listed building that affects the historical character without consent is a criminal offense. 

However, if you are using an architect, they will be the best people to guide and advise you through the planning process.  

Planning your design for the flat extension –  

Once your planning is approved it is a good idea to plan and understand exactly what you require to do with the new space. Do you want to extend the kitchen? Open up the living room? Or create another bedroom?  

It is also important to play around with the space and work out the best layout for the extension. A popular element many homeowners like to include is natural daylight. So, to increase the property value and aesthetic of the home you should think about including skylights and bi-folding doors.  

Lewisham basement flat extension - JNJ Building Solutions

Contact us

Architecture & Building, Flat Conversions

Looking To Live In A Maisonette? Everything You Should Know

What is a maisonette?  

It is a set of rooms for living in, typically on two storeys of a larger building and having a separate entrance.  

The difference between a maisonette and a flat –  

A maisonette is a two-storey flat, where the front door is your own. This means you can exit your home directly to the outside. However, with a regular flat, you have a shared corridor. And your usual flat consists of several rooms that span a single floor.  

Maisonettes are often more bespoke than flats and aren’t typically sold as part of a development block. They also vary largely in square footage, layout, and spec. Living in a maisonette also gives you more outside space as opposed to a flat.  

Is a maisonette a house? 

They are not necessarily a house although they can come with similar square footage and many of the same perks. For instance, they offer similar privacy to that of a house, and they are argued to be safer. Because with all the windows on the higher level, and the only access is the front for it is less likely you would get burgled. 

Maisonettes are ideal for families because just like a house they often house gardens and sometimes even garages. However, the garden might have to be shared with others in the flats. And you’ll have to access the garden separately outside, typically through a side gate.  

Where can I find them?  

In the UK maisonettes are not uncommon, you can find them usually above shops, in town centres and close to cities. Due to them being slightly smaller and more affordable than a house many are located in cities.  

They are also popular in areas with lots of students because landlords convert one house into two separate dwellings to take on more tenants.  

Is it good to live in one?  

There are plenty of advantages to living in a maisonette the first one is that they are warm and cosy. Being upstairs is a major positive especially in the winter because the heat from the downstairs flat rises and it heats up the house.  

Maisonettes often also have a lot of storage compared to a flat or an apartment. This is because most of them have exterior storage such as a garage.  

Maisonettes itself would be about 20-25% cheaper than the equivalent space in that block.  

Some negatives to living in one –  

Although there are many positives, there are some hurdles to living in a maisonette. With either no off-road parking or a shared driveway parking you can be difficult. And a lot of people find parking on a residential street a nightmare.  

When living above someone you have to be extra neighbourly, you need to be respectful and keep an eye on the amount of noise you make.  

8 Maisonette Designs That Are a Step Up from Your Usual HDBs | Qanvast
A modern maisonette

Contact us