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Tag: structure

Architecture & Building

The Top Materials To Use If You Are Building A House

Are you looking to build a new home but are unsure on what materials to use? This blog will tell you all of the best materials you should consider.  

Wood –  

Wood is normally used when building the inside and structure of the house, it isn’t really used for the outside. This is because it can absorb dampness and some wood attracts bugs. However, the popularity comes from its affordability and it is lightweight and easy to work with. It also acts as an insulator, which keeps the cold air out and the warm air in. Wood can also be an eco-friendly option when brought from a responsible supplier. Wood has a lower carbon footprint than other materials, using less energy to produce.  

Wooden Houses, Log Cabin, Timber House with Free Design | InGreen

Concrete –  

If you are looking for a material that is both strong and cost-effective then concrete would be the best option. Concrete is a mixture of sand, stone, and water, which then dries and hardens. Because it is so strong, the material can be used to support entire structures. In addition, concrete buildings are low maintenance and they last for a long time. Concrete is also very energy-efficient, it is able to transfer heat absorbed during the day and release it at night when it’s cooler. This may cost the building owners less in the future.  

Luxury modern concrete house in Trento [ Timelapse ] - YouTube

Steel –  

Steel is the strongest material to withstand any structure. It is also a very eco-friendly material to use because it doesn’t pollute the air and it doesn’t affect and involve cutting any trees down. Having a steel structure can make it much safer if there are any natural disasters that strike, it is the most secure structure. Because steel increase durability and longevity, it will be a more costly material.  

Light Gauge Steel Framing for Housing - Hadley Group

Brick –  

Bricks are one of the most durable building materials that are used in construction. If you are looking for your building to withstand time, then brick may be the best option. Buildings made from bricks tend to retain their value over time, for example, the great wall of China. However, when using bricks, you need a solid base to make them safe in cruel climate conditions.  

Can You Render Over Brick? The Full Truth! | Home Logic UK

Stone –  

Stone is another material that has been used for centuries and it has been proved to hold up over time. Many people like to use stone because of its unique appearances. You can go for the style of its aw form for a rustic look or a more finished form for a modern style. It is also durable and is able to protect homes from environmental threats.  

Gallery | Bricklaying and Building Services | Consett

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Architecture & Building

Find Out The Journey Of Building A Carport

Building a carport is a great way of providing protection for your vehicle, whilst increasing the value and appeal to your home. 

Here are the steps to build an enclosed carport.  

Step 1: Preparation to start the carport –  

The first thing you should do is check with your local planning authority to make sure your proposed project is up to code. Once you have been approved by the planning authority you can then prepare the carport to be enclosed. 

 You should start by clearing the area that the carport will be placed. Then you will need to pour a concrete slab to support the new room. However, before you pour the slab you need to make sure that you have measured how much space is required. For an average car, you need to measure at least 4.9 metres. It is best to make a wooden box to create a template for the concrete to set in once it’s poured. Try to ensure that the concrete slab is level with the rest of your house.  

Step 2: Purchase the necessary building materials –  

You can build carports from wood, metal, and sometimes brick, depending on the style you want and if you want it to match the materials on your home.  

When choosing the materials, you should keep in mind the climate of where you live. Different materials and designs may be more or less appropriate for where in the world you live. For example, lumber may be more appropriate for drier climates. They are also known to be more secure and durable. 

Step 3: start building the walls –  

Now you need to measure the size of the carport and start building the frames for the walls. To secure the walls to the carport you’ll build a simple rectangular box. If you are not creating an enclosed carport then you would move on to the roof. Whereas, if your project is an enclosed carport you will need to add stud walls. You will also need to frame openings for any windows or doors you want to include.  

Then you should secure the frames and the walls to the concrete floors by bolting them down.  

Step 4: building the roof –  

The next step is to fasten the rafters to the side beams. Rafters that will support the roof will be fastened to the wooden box. You should then fasten plywood roof boards to the rafters  

Step 5: Check the stability of the structure –  

When the roofing of your carport is complete, you should take the time to check the stability of the structure. If everything is done properly the carport should be quite solid. If there is any movement when you are checking the stability, you will have to add structure braces as reinforcement.  

Step 6: Finishing touches to the carport-  

For the finishing touches of your carport, you need to caulk the plywood roof seams. This is to keep the elements out, it is important to cover the roof with tar paper to create a waterproof surface, before shingling over it. Then you should fasten the shingles on top of the plywood roof. After that, you can then stain or paint the wood elements, increasing the longevity in the process. Once you have finished all the touches your carport is ready to go.  

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Advice Center

A Full Beginner’s Guide To A Heritage Impact Assessment

Firstly, if you are thinking of buying a listed building or moving into a conservation area, and are thinking of making external changes to your home, this blog is for you.  

Altering or extending a listed building isn’t like changing any other type of structure. The level of information about the existing property, and what you propose to change about it is very different from a standard planning application. One thing you need to supply is a Heritage impact statement.  

What is a heritage impact assessment?  

A heritage impact assessment (HIA)is a document that outlines the historic or archaeological significance of a building or landscape within its wider setting. In addition, it includes an outline of any proposed works. Also, an assessment of their impact on the building or landscape, and a mitigation strategy.  

For example, The document considers the:  

  • The cultural heritage of the place 
  • The nature of proposed development 
  • The likely impact of that development on the significance of the place.  

Understanding the significance of a historic building complex or area and the possible impact of the proposed scheme on this sign is the key to good conservation practice. In addition, good information, available from the outset, can speed up the processing of applications. It can also reduce costs and lead to a better overall design.   

Why do you need a heritage impact assessment? 

You need to submit a heritage statement when you are proposing works that could affect a heritage asset in some way.   

A heritage impact assessment is needed for an application that affects a heritage asset. For instance, this would be needed for: 

  •  listed building consent applications 
  • Planning permission applications for sites within the setting of a listed building 
  • Building or developing in conservation areas 
  • Planning permission applications for sites within the scheduled ancient monument 
  • Planning permission applications for sites within registered parks and gardens 
  • Advertising consent applications on listed buildings or buildings in conservation areas. 

How much does the heritage assessment cost?  

Finally, depending on the simplicity or complexity of the proposed development. An assessment could be anywhere between, a £220 single-page letter of opinion. Or a full-blown £22,000 report.  

How the Heritage Impact Assessment process protects historic sites |  Planning, BIM & Construction Today

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