Tag: application

Advice Center, Planning Permission

Can you make amendments to a submitted planning application?

To apply for planning permission, you would need to submit a planning application. However, it is easy to make a mistake such as the wrong name, or if you want to make amendments. This blog will explain to you if you would be able to change a submitted planning application. 

Making amendements to your application –  

According to the council, it is possible to amend your plans while the application is running. Although it would only be acceptable for minor amendments. Any big amendments won’t be accepted and you would need to apply for a new application. 

You can submit an application via the planning portal. It is often the easiest way because they also have a lot of information to help.

What do the statuses of your application mean?  

  • Drafted. Meaning that you are filling out the application and haven’t sent it to the local authority yet.  
  • Submitted. These applications can be amended as they haven’t been downloaded by the Planning Authority.  
  • Transferred applications are changed in a controlled manner. This is because they’ve alrbeen received by the planning authority.

How long do amendments take?  

The council should give you an answer within 28 days. Unless they have contacted you and a different time has been agreed upon.  

Cost of an amended application –  

The application fees can change due to the nature of the amendments, and you may need to pay an additional fee. If you believe a refund is due, then you would need to discuss this with the local planning authority. Once they have validated your amended application and confirmed the fee due.  

The application fees can change due to the nature of the amendments, and you may need to pay an additional fee. If you believe a refund is due, then you would need to discuss this with the local planning authority once they have validated your amended application and confirmed the fee due.  

What you CAN and CAN'T do after planning approval

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Advice Center, Planning Permission

How to apply for a dropped kerb

A dropped kerb is where there is a dip in the path and kerb that lets you park your car on a driveway outside your house. The kerb is dropped from the normal height and the path is strengthened to take the weight of the vehicle.  

Before you apply –  

To have a dropped kerb it must: 

  • Leave enough room for you to park your vehicle completely on the property. 
  • Be a minimum width of 2.4m  
  • Be more than 10m away from a road junction.  
  • Meets visibility guidelines 
  • Have suitable drainage near your house.  
  • Be at least 1.5m from streetlights. 
  • Avoid removing tree roots 
  • Have permission from the property owner. 

Planning permission –  

You must contact your council to find out if you require planning permission for a dropped kerb. Then, if the council confirms that you need to require permission, you will then have to apply for an application. However, if the council tells you planning permission isn’t necessary, they would require confirmation. 

Existing dropped kerbs –  

If you would like to extend an existing dropped kerb, you must create a new application.  

Application cost –  

Householder application  

  • The cost to apply for permission is £320 
  • £150 will be returned if the permission is declined or not approved.  
  • Applications are usually handled by the housing or environmental health department at your local council. 

Developer application 

Administration and inspection fees are based on the following rules:  

  • 2 to 5 properties – £215 per property 
  • 6 to 25 properties – £106 per property 
  • More than 25 properties – £2,650 

Building cost –  

Once you have got the planning permission, you can then hire a contractor to start the work.  

The average cost of building a drop kerb, and depending on the complexity will cost around £1000. And a contractor will usually charge an additional £180 – £220.  

There can also be additional costs that you should be aware of. Here is a list of extra things you may want to consider when dropping a kerb:  

  • New driveway 
  • Wall demolition 
  • New driveway gate 
  • New fence 
  • Skip hire 
  • CCTV system  
  • Outdoor lighting 
  • Removing trees 
  • Moving a street light 

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Advice Center

Planning Application Rejected? Here’s How To Resolve The Issue

If the authority refuses to give you permission for a planning application, they must give you a written reason explaining why it was denied.  If you are unhappy or unclear about the reasons for refusal you should talk to a member of the local authority planning department.  

Withdraw and resubmit –  

Withdrawing and resubmitting the application is the best option if something has come to light that could get your application denied. You should withdraw the application before it gets rejected. Then make the changes and resubmit.  

Apply for a planning application appeal –  

You can ask the local authorities that if changing the plans will make a difference.  You must submit your appeal within three months, if you have a major project, you have up to six months.  

However, the council will send you information on how to appeal. There are three ways of doing so – in writing, at an informal hearing, and a public inquiry. 

 Most councils will ask you to go down the in-writing route. You will get an informal hearing if there is a lot of public interest in the plans. A public inquiry will only take place for the most complex of cases.  

When appealing in writing you’ll need to write down all of the reasons why you think your application should have received planning permission. When writing you should be as detailed as possible and focus on the planning matters.  

Once this has been completed, a planning inspector will visit your home. The inspector will give his decision on the appeal within two to six weeks of the visit.  

Reasons your planning application can be refused –  

  • Protection of green belt land – local authorities are under clear instruction to strongly oppose any schemes involving potential harm to the openness of the green belt.  
  • Negative effect on character and appearance – this can be the most frequent issue. Projects that change the pattern of the houses are usually denied.
  • Loss of a family home – projects that want to convert a house into flats or non-residential places are a common reason for refusing this type of planning application.  
  • Overshadowing – you need to make sure your development doesn’t overshadow the neighbouring properties causing loss of light.  
  • Overlooking homes – causing loss of privacy. 

Accept the decision – 

Finally, your other option is to just accept the decision. Sometimes there will be circumstances in which your planning application will be denied. And there is nothing anyone can do about it.

You now know how to handle the situation, if your planning application is denied. Finding the best option is dependent upon the terms of refusal and on your determination to get what you want. 

If you would like some planning advice, get in touch.  

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